Write Now Prompt for April 21, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

She knew things weren’t good when the plumber started mumbling to himself.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

Interview with author Michelle Hughes

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Michelle Hughes is not an easy writer to pin down. She’s mostly a romance writer, but  there are different sub-genres within romance. She writes vampire romance and cowboy romance and coming of age romance.

I see you have an extensive publishing history. What was your first book and how did you decide to self-publish? How has that been different from Kindle Scout?

The first book I published was ‘A Night at Tears of Crimson.’  I pulled that book down in 2015 and rewrote it completely.  I had no idea what I was doing in 2009 and while the story was based on reoccurring dreams, it was dreadfully formatted and lacked the experience I have now.   I think Kindle Scout gives you the confidence in knowing your book was good enough to be chosen over hundreds of others.  They also promote your book to an audience you’d be hard-pressed to find on your own.

 You write in different genres. Is genre something you consider before you start writing or is it a decision you make at the end?

I’ve always been a writer that flies by the seat of my pants.  An idea hits me, then I start writing and I usually look at the finished product wondering where this came from.  If I don’t ‘feel’ a book, it’s impossible for me to write.

 How long does it typically take you to write a book?

It depends.  Some books I’ve taken a year to write, others in 30 days.  I do find that trying to make myself write is harder for me.  I enjoy spontaneity in writing, and when I put myself on a schedule, it ruins my creativity.

What are the biggest challenges you face with your writing and how do you overcome them?

Being a mother of five children is probably my biggest challenge to writing.  I have three grown children but two of those still live at home.  It’s gotten much easier as they’ve gotten older. I wouldn’t trade them for anything, though.  My greatest accomplishment in life is my children.

 Tell us about what you’re working on now.

I’ve just released the second book in the Tears of Crimson series, and I’m working on the third. I have several other ideas that have yet to be started.  Like I said earlier, I write when the motivation hits, so who knows what will come next.

To find out more about Michelle Hughes, visit her website.

Write Now Prompt for April 18, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

She couldn’t believe her son had volunteered to be on the first manned mission to Mars.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

The Writers Circle: What’s Your Point of View

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One of our goals here at Today’s Author is to help all of the writers among us to do what we love to do: write. One of the best ways to accomplish this is by talking to each other and learning from each other.  Our Writers Circle series is designed to do just that – provide a chance for us to discuss writing, editing and publishing questions.

This week’s topic is:

We make many decisions about characters, plot and settings when we are writing. But one of the most important decisions we make is the choice of our narrative point of view. The choice of first, second or third person point of view impacts how we as writers interact with the story as well as how our readers interact with it.  What goes into your decision of which point of view you will use in your story? Have you ever gotten part way into the story only to realize you made the wrong choice for point of view? What tips do you have for the Today’s Author community for how to best determine the optimal point of view for a given story?

Let’s discuss this in the comments and see what our community thinks.

Write Now Prompt for April 14, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

The fire at the old, abandoned factory was officially declared accidental, but no one in town believed that to be true.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

Write Now Prompt for April 11, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

All the dogs in the neighborhood started barking and howling at once.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

Write Now Prompt for April 7, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

She had seen thousands of sunrises, but this one was different.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

Write Now Prompt for April 4, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

The jury didn’t take long to deliberate.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.

Fourth Dimensional Writing

When I say, “the fourth dimension,” what images come to mind?  Hyperspheres, tesseracts, spacetime equations, quantum theory, or perhaps Doc Brown from the movie, Back to the Future, telling Marty, “You’re not thinking fourth dimensionally.”

Well, I think of writing.

One of the common things new writers are told (just after, “show, don’t tell”) is the famous, “write three dimensional characters.”  It makes some sense if you think about what that means.  Let’s step through the dimensions and see.

One dimension – a straight line or a character that only shows one aspect.  In a story that might be the waiter taking an order, or delivery person bringing a package.  The character is there for one purpose to move the plot in one direction – the needed food shows up, the unwanted interruption happens, or the forged passports arrive in a brown paper wrapper.  All we need to know about the character is the one thing.

Two dimensions – width and length in geometry – a simple, flat shape.  Perhaps a triangle, square or circle. This is a character who fits into the story; is predictable and often is a stereotype or archetype.  The character exists for the hero to interact with and does things, but we don’t really get to know them as people.  This might be a taxi driver who’s conversation gets our hero talking to reveal important plot information.  Perhaps it’s the doctor telling us how the murder victim died.  This 2D person is a minor part of the story.

Then there is the holy grail of the three-dimensional character.  Geometry class would be showing us cubes, spheres and cones.  English classes would talk about fully rounded characters.  These are people who have depth, feelings, history, are unpredictable and complex.  This is typically the story’s hero, protagonist or antagonist.  A 3D character adds details and layers to the story that in some cases don’t move the plot forward, but instead add a sense of reality or depth to the story.

That brings us to the fourth dimension.  Mathematically and geometrically difficult to describe and I won’t even try.  In popular writings the fourth dimension is often described as time.  The fourth dimension is watching a 3D object moving through time.  Likely not scientifically true, but in story telling the concept is useful. A 4D character is one who not only has width, height and depth but also changes over time.

A 4D character might be a soldier who at the beginning of the story is committed to the war, but by the end of the story has a change of heart (the opposite story line is also possible).  You might describe the young idealistic doctor early in the story then and show how the doctor transforms into the cynical old medic.  A 4D character is not constant in their reactions and over the arch of the story, changes. 

It’s possible for whole stories to be told in 4D.  Back to the Future is an example of that kind of story telling.  The ever popular Harry Potter stories are another example. Over the course of seven novels, Harry goes from innocent childhood to a battle weary youth to a hopeful young man.  A single well-rounded character moving through time – changing, growing, and becoming something other than his “under the cupboard” self.

My current work in progress is a 4D story and so far I am finding both fun and frustrating to write.  It’s fun to pick up an object and predict where it might be in five years.  A pencil will be shorter, a car dented, and a tree taller, but with people it’s not so easy.  Overcoming an obstacle might make one person stronger while it breaks the spirit of another.  When I envisioned my story it was a simple tale of a boy escaping a city and becoming a man.  Then I wondered how did a city come to exist that forced a boy to need to escape it?  That naturally flowed into the question, “What world does this new man find or build?”

The possibilities are endless when you can view a fully formed person over the span of a life time.

Write Now Prompt for March 31, 2017

Write_Now_Plane

At Today’s Author, our first goal is to get you (and us) to write. Write Now is our own collection of prompts to help you do that. With Write Now we’re not talking about writing, or trying to teach anyone how to write. Write Now is all about putting pen to paper.

Today’s Prompt:

Even the heavy rains and thunderstorms would not dampen her spirits today.

Now_Write_Plane

How to play along with our Writing Prompts

  1. Write in any format or style you wish: short story, poem, script – whatever you like.
  2. Write for at least 5 minutes. There is no time limit – write for as long as you wish!
  3. Editing is not required, though we do recommend that you run a spell check at least.
  4. Post your work to your blog and include a link back here so your readers can find other writer’s work, too.
  5. Come back here and provide a link to your work on the Write Now! prompt for which it was written.
  6. Read other authors’ posts and leave constructive comments.

Important Note: When you post a draft of your work online, it may be difficult to find a publisher who will accept it, as many see an online document as being previously published. It may also be ineligible to be submitted for certain writing competitions. Always check publisher’s and competition guidelines before using a draft you put online.